Blues performances were organized by the Theater Owners Bookers Association in nightclubs such as the Cotton Club and juke joints such as the bars along Beale Street in Memphis. Kentucky-born Sylvester Weaver was in the first to record the slide guitar style, in which a guitar is fretted with a knife blade or the sawed-off neck of a bottle. Country blues performers often improvised, either without accompaniment or with only a banjo or guitar.

Regional styles of country blues varied widely in the early 20th century. The Mississippi Delta blues was a rootsy sparse style with passionate vocals accompanied by slide guitar. The little-recorded Robert Johnson [71] combined elements of urban and rural blues. In addition to Robert Johnson, influential performers of this style included his predecessors Charley Patton and Son House. Singers such as Blind Willie McTell and Blind Boy Fuller performed in the southeastern "delicate and lyrical" Piedmont blues tradition, which used an elaborate ragtime-based fingerpicking guitar technique.

The lively Memphis blues style, which developed in the s and s near Memphis, Tennesseewas influenced by jug bands such as the Memphis Jug Band or the Gus Cannon's Jug Stompers. Memphis Minnie was famous for her virtuoso guitar style. Pianist Memphis Slim began his career in Memphis, but his distinct style was smoother and had some swing elements. Many blues musicians based in Memphis moved to Chicago Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here!

(Vinyl) the late s or early s and became part of the urban blues movement. City or urban blues styles were more codified and elaborate, as a performer was no longer within their local, immediate community, and had to adapt to a larger, more varied audience's aesthetic.

Mamie Smithmore a vaudeville performer than a blues artist, was the first African American to record a blues song in ; her second record, "Crazy Blues", sold 75, copies in its first month.

Smith would "sing a song in an unusual key, and her artistry in bending and stretching notes with her beautiful, powerful contralto to accommodate her own interpretation was unsurpassed". In the vaudeville singer Lucille Hegamin became the second black woman to record blues when she recorded "The Jazz Me Blues", [79] and Victoria Spiveysometimes called Queen Victoria or Za Zu Girl, had a recording career that began in and spanned forty years.

These recordings were typically labeled " race records " to distinguish them from records sold to white audiences. Nonetheless, the recordings of some of the classic female blues singers were purchased by white buyers as well. The blues women thus effected changes in other types of popular singing that had spin-offs in jazz, Broadway musicalstorch songs of the s and s, gospelrhythm and bluesand eventually rock and roll. An important label of this era was the Chicago-based Bluebird Records.

Carr accompanied himself on the piano with Scrapper Blackwell on guitar, a format that continued well into the s with artists such as Charles Brown and even Nat "King" Cole. Boogie-woogie was another important style of s and early s urban blues. While the style is often associated with solo piano, boogie-woogie was also used to accompany singers and, as a solo part, in bands and small combos. Boogie-Woogie style was characterized by a regular bass figure, an ostinato or riff and shifts of level in the left hand, elaborating each chord and trills and decorations in the right hand.

John Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here! (Vinyl) classic rhythm and blues with blues styles. Another development in this period was big band blues. A well-known big band blues tune is Glenn Miller 's " In the Mood ". In the s, the jump blues style developed.

Jump blues grew up from the boogie woogie wave and was strongly influenced by big band music. It uses saxophone or other brass instruments and the guitar in the rhythm section to create a jazzy, up-tempo sound with declamatory vocals. Jump blues tunes by Louis Jordan and Big Joe Turnerbased in Kansas City, Missouriinfluenced the development of later styles such as rock and roll and rhythm and blues.

The transition from country blues to urban blues that began in the s was driven by the successive waves of economic crisis and booms that led many rural blacks to move to urban areas, in a movement known as the Great Migration. The long boom following World War II induced another massive migration of the African-American population, the Second Great Migrationwhich was accompanied by a significant increase of the real income of the urban blacks.

The new migrants constituted a new market for the music industry. The term race recordinitially used by the music industry for African-American music, was replaced by the term rhythm and blues. This rapidly evolving market was mirrored by Billboard magazine's Rhythm and Blues chart. Electric blues used electric guitarsdouble bass gradually replaced by bass guitardrumsand harmonica or "blues harp" played through a microphone and a PA system or an overdriven guitar amplifier.

Chicago became a center for electric blues from on, when Muddy Waters recorded his first success, "I Can't Be Satisfied". Their style is characterized by the use of electric guitar, sometimes slide guitar, harmonica, and a rhythm section of bass and drums. Brown played in bands led by Elmore James and by J. Lenoirbut the saxophone was used as a backing instrument for rhythmic support more than as a lead instrument. Other harp players such as Big Walter Horton were also influential.

Muddy Waters and Elmore James were known for their innovative use of slide electric guitar. Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters were known for their deep, "gravelly" voices. The bassist and prolific songwriter and composer Willie Dixon played a major role on the Chicago blues scene.

Smaller blues labels of this era included Vee-Jay Records and J. During the early s, the dominating Chicago labels were challenged by Sam Phillips ' Sun Records company in Memphis, which recorded B. King and Howlin' Wolf before he moved to Chicago in In the s, blues had a huge influence on mainstream American popular music.

While popular musicians like Bo Diddley [89] and Chuck Berry[95] both recording for Chess, were influenced by the Chicago blues, their enthusiastic playing styles departed from the melancholy aspects of blues. Chicago blues also influenced Louisiana 's zydeco music, [96] with Clifton Chenier [97] using blues accents. Zydeco musicians used electric solo guitar and cajun arrangements of blues standards.

In England, electric blues took root there during a much acclaimed Muddy Waters tour in Waters, unsuspecting of his audience's tendency towards skifflean acoustic, softer brand of blues, turned up his amp and started to play his Chicago brand of electric blues. Although the audience was largely jolted by the performance, the performance influenced local musicians such as Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies to emulate this louder style, inspiring the British invasion of the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds.

Other blues artists, such as John Lee Hooker had influences not directly related to the Chicago style. John Lee Hooker's blues is more "personal", based on Hooker's deep rough voice accompanied by a single electric guitar.

Though not directly influenced by boogie woogie, his "groovy" style is sometimes called "guitar boogie". Strongly influenced by Jimmy Reedswamp blues has a slower pace and a simpler use of the harmonica than the Chicago blues style performers such as Little Walter or Muddy Waters.

Alan Lomax 's recordings of Mississippi Fred McDowell would eventually bring him wider attention on both the blues and folk circuit, with McDowell's droning style influencing North Mississippi hill country blues musicians. By the beginning of the s, genres influenced by African American music such as rock and roll and soul were part of mainstream popular music.

White performers such as the Beatles had brought African-American music to new audiences, both within the U. However, the blues wave that brought artists such as Muddy Waters to the foreground had stopped. Dick Waterman and the blues festivals he organized in Europe played a major role in propagating blues music abroad.

In the UK, bands emulated U. Blues performers such as John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters continued to perform to enthusiastic audiences, inspiring new artists steeped in traditional blues, such as New York—born Taj Mahal. John Lee Hooker blended his blues style with rock elements and playing with younger white musicians, creating a musical style that can be heard on the album Endless Boogie.

King 's singing and virtuoso guitar technique earned him the eponymous title "king of the blues". King introduced a sophisticated style of guitar soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists. Tennessee -born Bobby "Blue" Blandlike B. The music of the civil rights movement [] and Free Speech Movement in the U.

As well festivals such as the Newport Folk Festival [] brought traditional blues to a new audience, which helped to revive interest in prewar acoustic blues and performers such as Son HouseMississippi John HurtSkip Jamesand Reverend Gary Davis.

Lenoir from the Chicago blues movement in the s recorded several LPs using acoustic guitar, sometimes accompanied by Willie Dixon on the acoustic bass or drums. His songs, originally distributed only in Europe, [] commented on political issues such as racism or Vietnam War issues, which was unusual for this period. His album Alabama Blues contained a song with the following lyric:.

I never will go back to Alabama, that is not the place for me 2x You know they killed my sister and my brother and the whole world let them peoples go down there free. White audiences' interest in the blues during the s increased due to the Chicago-based Paul Butterfield Blues Band featuring guitarist Michael Bloomfieldand the British blues movement.

One blues rock performer, Jimi Hendrixwas a rarity in his field at the time: a black man who played psychedelic rock. Hendrix was a skilled guitarist, and a pioneer in the innovative use of distortion and audio feedback in his music. In the early s, the Texas rock-blues style emerged, which used guitars in both solo and rhythm roles. In contrast with the West Side blues, the Texas style is strongly influenced by the British rock-blues movement.

These artists all began their musical careers in the s but they did not achieve international success until the next decade. Since the s there has been a resurgence of interest in the blues among a certain part of the African-American population, particularly around Jackson, Mississippi and other deep South regions. Often termed " soul blues " or " Southern soul ", the music at the heart of this movement was given new life by the unexpected success of two particular recordings on the Jackson-based Malaco label: [] Z.

Buchana, Ms. Jody, Shirley Brownand dozens of others. During the s blues also continued in both traditional and new forms. In the album Strong Persuader announced Robert Cray as a major blues artist. The first Stevie Ray Vaughan recording Texas Flood was released inand the Texas-based guitarist exploded onto the international stage. John Lee Hooker 's popularity was revived with the album The Healer in Eric Claptonknown for his performances with the Blues Breakers and Creammade a comeback in the s with his album Unpluggedin which he played some standard blues numbers on acoustic guitar.

However, beginning in the s, digital multitrack recording and other technological advances and new marketing strategies including video clip production increased costs, challenging the spontaneity and improvisation that are an important component of blues music. In the s, the largely ignored hill country blues gained minor recognition in both blues and alternative rock music circles with northern Mississippi artists R.

Burnside and Junior Kimbrough. The Billboard Blues Album chart provides an overview of current blues hits.

Blues musical styles, forms bar bluesmelodies, and the blues scale have influenced many other genres of music, such as rock and roll, jazz, and popular music.

The author noted his first repeated playthroughs of the game in and involved disarming the bomb instead, being given a modest reward by the residents of the city, and igniting the wrath of the city's antagonist.

Burke and Alistair Tenpenny. At this time, Cheng notes he was using a video game recording software to capture the gameplay as he planned to show the footage at future presentations regarding his paper.

Tenpenny's embodiment of the Enclave's radical authority and extremist ideologies. Tenpenny's triumph. Whether theatrical or not, Cheng also notes it was the obedient thing to do where he had hesitated to press the button, but was compelled by the march as well as the gameplay. He wondered if he had been more or less likely to continue with the act if the radio was playing classical music or if it was turned off. After asking for volunteers from the assembled professors and graduate students to push the "Big Red Button", half the people in the room hesitantly raised their hands.

The volunteer picked at random to set off the fictional bomb said she felt "strangely guilty" in front of her peers and professors "even though the people [the Megaton residents] weren't real! Cheng's second example featured a lighter gameplay instance.

Though access to Enclave Radio and Galaxy New Radio was readily available at the beginning of the game, Cheng notes he had to complete a specific quest of retrieving and giving a violin to gain access to the private radio signal about Agatha's Station "about eight hours into the game.

In contrast to the music at Megaton, Cheng remarked that the music here had served as a method of disobedience to ignore the gameplay where he had "subtly transgressed against the game itself, dismissing its call to arms one track at a time. Regarding the musical content of the radio stations in Fallout 3Cheng loosely summarizes them as "the s GNRs the Enclave's Sousaor s Agatha's Bach.

Cheng notes that this private signal can only be detected on the player's Pip-Boy and not on any other available radio set. This so-called pirate underground radio station of music praised in the present-day "for its alleged universal appeal—provides a fittingly ironic reflection of the wasteland's cultural upheavals.

Cheng notes there are "conspicuous double entendres when heard in the game's postapocalyptic setting" and details lines and lyrics from "I Don't Want to Set the World on Fire", "Civilization", and "Butcher Pete" in 's Fallout 3.

Songs like "Atom Bomb Baby", "Uranium Fever", and "Uranium Rock" were regarded as whimsical "novelty songs" at the time, but also are loaded with the period's "pervasive anxieties". All four "present warnings and moral judgement" singing about people who "find their comeuppance" in the country, film noir, and femme fatale genres. With modern musicians tackling age-old themes in a contemporary fashion, the "illusion was seamless" among the older songs on the Fallout: New Vegas soundtrack.

Cheng also notes that similar games have featured diegetic licensed music before such as the BioShock series and the Grand Theft Auto seriesin Fallout 3 the player wields exceptional control "over the very existence of radio music in the wasteland. Setting aside the player agency regarding personal control over the airwaves' content, Cheng offers diegetic and non-diegetic explanations for the seemingly limited setlists of the radio stations in Fallout 3.

Players may ask why "there's no trace of music composed at the very least between and " and whether it flourished or failed to be preserved. Ostensibly, the primary reason for the song selection from decades ago is "reduced licensing costs" though using songs by "more recent artists say, Golijov or Gaga [a modern classical music composer and a modern pop singer] would have had greater difficulty establishing the vague sense of pastness" while this "hodgepodge of pres tunes could sound sufficiently old" by modern players of the Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here!

(Vinyl). A former Elvis impersonation school serves as the headquarters of a gang called "The Kings". The limited or non-existent nature of the music of Elvis has helped to create an alternate "ahistorical world" where "all that remains is a shadow" of the original context.

Though the terms may appear interchangeable, they provide different connotations. Namely "appropriated music" more readily conveys usage with "whole or with little modification", it remains " recognisable ", and " recontextualised ". Borrowed music can be easily returned, but appropriated music "begs for a reason, a motivation, an explanation" despite the negative connotations as well as connecting to the historical use of "deliberate artistic appropriation" and "the entire spectrum of its sociocultural significance in mind.

Cheng notes that "most players are not likely to know the exact date or even decade of particular pieces" or perhaps have a hazy, "obscure, daresay conflated, past—remembrance without precise referent. Three Dog of Galaxy News Radio gives speeches against "bigots" and "ghouls", humans who have been drastically mutated through radiation.

Enclave Radio serves as propaganda to accomplish their goal to remove irradiated "impure" humans from the wasteland. Galaxy News Radio may be remembered from "old-timey films, television parodies, theme parties, and grandparents' dusty records" and "cheery, sassy nonchalance", but also for the "brutal wartime climates out of which this repertoire emerged.

However, Cheng also brings up how the music has brought back a revived interest to a new generation. Players "upon completing their adventure Insinger Dion DiMucci filed a lawsuit against video game publisher ZeniMax Media for the use of " The Wanderer " in the television commercials for Fallout 4. The lawsuit alleged the commercials "were objectionable because they featured repeated homicides in a dark, dystopian landscape, where violence is glorified as sport" as well as being "repugnant and morally indefensible".

He notes there are other unofficial, but popular videos with "2. It has a body count so high that I'm not even going to bother enumerating it" and hypothesizes "that someone, either DiMucci or a person acting on his behalf, went to Google up 'Wanderer' and 'Fallout' and found Valenzuela's video, thinking it was an official release from Zenimax".

ZeniMax Media Inc. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. March Later released on the album Nerve Damage.

See the album article page for more footnotes. Both halves of the song would be featured in 's Fallout 4. Likewise the track was also issued on the reverse side of the same 10 inch vinyl 78 rpm phonograph record on the Charles Brull Harmonic Private Recording label as "Jazz Interlude". Due to how record pressing plants function, it is presumed both tracks were recorded around the same time in based on the Swedish films noted above.

The same transcription disc also featured the then-newly composed song " The Old Master Painter " noted in the December 24, issue of Billboard magazine as "No information on electrical transcription libraries available as The Billboard goes to press" while Bob Crosby's version of "Dear Hearts and Gentle People" is not noted as available.

Contemporary reviews for the Bing Crosby album noted it as "an oldie". The record also appears in the Danish daily radio broadcasting schedule sendeplan of the Statsradiofonien digitized by the Dansk Kulturarv. The digital restoration and compilation was done by John Mortarotti. All the tracks on the digital album feature alternate arrangements with the same melody as the base track except for "Treadin' Light" and "Boogie Man" which have retained the error of alternating swapped titles and melodies.

Gerhard Trede died in Fallout: New Vegas uses the original recording from Columbia Records. The recording used in the game was originally taken from the audio track of Snader Telescription which Peggy Lee had filmed with Dave Barbour in The title refers to the Roundhouse venue in London which first opened for concerts in See the album page for more details on the dates and litigation surrounding the album.

Though other Columbia Records tracks in the game are attributed as such "Big Iron", "Jingle Jangle Jingle"the end credits indicate that "Heartaches by the Number" was licensed instead from Dominion Entertainment Inc.

The following year inK-Tel filed for bankruptcy. The track was subsequently reissued on other budget labels with K-Tel reissuing it on their house label as Hooked on Country in part of the Hooked on Classics series [] and later as Dominion Entertainment in Perry died in Recording the Sonoton album in is mentioned on the official band website.

See annotation for "In the Shadow of the Valley" above. The vocalists are not credited. However in"business has never been better" and RCA had "its three pressing plants going at full time, they've gone to outside pressing plants to keep up with the orders.

Columbia Records documentation held at the Library of Congress indicates that the XTV matrix prefix stands for a "12" mono LP master" while the number of digits in the XTV number can be assigned to a pressing year. Harry Bluestone died in Harry Lubin died in The CD booklet does not provide lyrics, but credits the male and female vocal versions as sung by Claire Martin and Danny Street as well as listing the musicians who performed on the album.

Originally written for the film of the same name, One More Tomorrowwhich debuted on June 1, Frankie Carle's recording was advertised in Billboard magazine on April 27, Advertised in Billboard magazine on February 14,[] formally reviewed on February Advertised in Billboard magazine on September 23, Advertised in Billboard magazine on December 23,[] formally reviewed the following January 13, Reviewed in Cashbox magazine on May 5, Described as having been recorded "last week" in a dated byline of November 5th in the Billboard magazine issue from November 12, Multiple groups named The Five Stars recorded under this era and are frequently confused for each other on song compilations.

Original Kernel Records issue formally reviewed in Billboard magazine on April 29, Originally recorded for Sun Recordsbut was unissued no Sun 45 from the era exists until it started appearing on Sun Records compilation albums decades later. CD reissues mention Warren Smith's "several alternate takes and unreleased material" from the Sun Studios.

Fallout 76 uses Take 1 issued on Okeh Records. Take 2 was issued on Vocalion and Columbia Records. Fallout 76 uses the Decca recording [] and not the Decca recording. The track was issued in as a 12" shellac 78 rpm record by RCA Victor and advertised as "'Fats' Waller's last record". The later Capitol Records version with Ella Mae Morse was advertised in Billboard magazine on July 27, [] and formally reviewed on August 3, Reviewed and advertised in Billboard magazine on March 13, Reviewed in Billboard magazine on February 14, Advertised in Billboard magazine on April 23,[] formally reviewed on May 7, Advertised in Billboard magazine on April 16, [] and formally reviewed on March 30, Password recovery.

Leave a reply Cancel reply Log in to leave a comment. In Audio Reviews. Nigel Jarrett - 16 September She is also active as the leader of a trio In Features. Trevor Hodgett - 14 August Mulligan memories, part 2 20 June Keith Tippett: spontaneous combustor 16 June In Columns. The lively Memphis blues style, which developed in the s and s near Memphis, Tennesseewas influenced by jug bands such as the Memphis Jug Band or the Gus Cannon's Jug Stompers. Memphis Minnie was famous for her virtuoso guitar style.

Pianist Memphis Slim began his career in Memphis, but his distinct style was smoother and had some swing elements. Many blues musicians based in Memphis moved to Chicago in the late s or early s and became part of the urban blues movement. City or urban blues styles were more codified and elaborate, as a performer was no longer within their local, immediate community, and had to adapt to a larger, more varied audience's aesthetic. Mamie Smithmore a vaudeville performer than a blues artist, was the first African American to record a blues song in ; her second record, "Crazy Blues", sold 75, copies in its first month.

Smith would "sing a song in an unusual key, and her artistry in bending and stretching notes with her beautiful, powerful contralto to accommodate her own interpretation was unsurpassed". In the vaudeville singer Lucille Hegamin became the second black woman to record blues when she recorded "The Jazz Me Blues", [79] and Victoria Spiveysometimes called Queen Victoria or Za Zu Girl, had a recording career that began in and spanned forty years.

These recordings were typically labeled " race records " to distinguish them from records sold to white audiences. Nonetheless, the recordings of some of the classic female blues singers were purchased by white buyers as well. The blues women thus effected changes in other types of popular singing that had spin-offs in jazz, Broadway musicalstorch songs of the s and s, gospelrhythm and bluesand eventually rock and roll.

An important label of this era was the Chicago-based Bluebird Records. Carr accompanied himself on the piano with Scrapper Blackwell on guitar, a format that continued well into the s with artists such as Charles Brown and even Nat "King" Cole. Boogie-woogie was another important style of s and early s urban blues.

While the style is often associated with solo piano, boogie-woogie was also used to accompany singers and, as a solo part, in bands and small combos. Boogie-Woogie style was characterized by a regular bass figure, an ostinato or riff and shifts of level in the left hand, elaborating each chord and trills and decorations in the right hand.

John blends classic rhythm and blues with blues styles. Another development in this period was big band blues. A well-known big band blues tune is Glenn Miller 's " In the Mood ". In the s, the jump blues style developed. Jump blues grew up from the boogie woogie wave and was strongly influenced by big band music. It uses saxophone or other brass instruments and the guitar in the rhythm section to create a jazzy, up-tempo sound with declamatory vocals.

Jump blues tunes by Louis Jordan and Big Joe Turnerbased in Kansas City, Missouriinfluenced the development of later styles such as rock and roll and rhythm and blues. The transition from country blues to urban blues that began in the s was driven by the successive waves of economic crisis and booms that led many rural blacks to move to urban areas, in a movement known as the Great Migration.

The long boom following World War II induced another massive migration of the African-American population, the Second Great Migrationwhich was accompanied by a significant increase of the real income of the urban blacks.

The new migrants constituted a new market for the music industry. The term race recordinitially used by the music industry for African-American music, was replaced by the term rhythm and blues. This rapidly evolving market was mirrored by Billboard magazine's Rhythm and Blues chart.

Electric blues used electric guitarsdouble bass gradually replaced by bass guitardrumsand harmonica or "blues harp" played through a microphone and a PA system or an overdriven guitar amplifier. Chicago became a center for electric blues from on, when Muddy Waters recorded his first success, "I Can't Be Satisfied". Their style is characterized by the use of electric guitar, sometimes slide guitar, harmonica, and a rhythm section of bass and drums. Brown played in bands led by Elmore James and by J.

Lenoirbut the saxophone was used as a backing instrument for rhythmic support more than as a lead instrument. Other harp players such as Big Walter Horton were also influential.

Muddy Waters and Elmore James were known for their innovative use of slide electric guitar. Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters were known for their deep, "gravelly" voices.

The bassist and prolific songwriter and composer Willie Dixon played a major role on the Chicago blues scene. Smaller blues labels of this era included Vee-Jay Records and J. During the early s, the dominating Chicago labels were challenged by Sam Phillips ' Sun Records company in Memphis, which recorded B. King and Howlin' Wolf before he moved to Chicago in In the s, blues had a huge influence on mainstream American popular music.

While popular musicians like Bo Diddley [89] and Chuck Berry[95] both recording for Chess, were influenced by the Chicago blues, their enthusiastic playing styles departed from the melancholy aspects of blues. Chicago blues also influenced Louisiana 's zydeco music, [96] with Clifton Chenier [97] using blues accents. Zydeco musicians used electric solo guitar and cajun arrangements of blues standards. In England, electric blues took root there during a much acclaimed Muddy Waters tour in Waters, unsuspecting of his audience's tendency towards skifflean acoustic, softer brand of blues, turned up his amp and started to play his Chicago brand of electric blues.

Although the audience was largely jolted by the performance, the performance influenced local musicians such as Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies to emulate this louder style, inspiring the British invasion of the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds.

Other blues artists, such as John Lee Hooker had influences not directly related to the Chicago style. John Lee Hooker's blues is more "personal", based on Hooker's deep rough voice accompanied by a single electric guitar. Though not directly influenced by boogie woogie, his "groovy" style is sometimes called "guitar boogie".

Strongly influenced by Jimmy Reedswamp blues has a slower pace and a simpler use of the harmonica than the Chicago blues style performers such as Little Walter or Muddy Waters. Alan Lomax 's recordings of Mississippi Fred McDowell would eventually bring him wider attention on both the blues and folk circuit, with McDowell's droning style influencing North Mississippi hill country blues musicians. By the beginning of the s, genres influenced by African American music such as rock and roll and soul were part of mainstream popular music.

White performers such as the Beatles had brought African-American music to new audiences, both within the U. However, the blues wave that brought artists such as Muddy Waters to the foreground had stopped.

Dick Waterman and the blues festivals he organized in Europe played a major role in propagating blues music abroad. In the UK, bands emulated U. Blues performers such as John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters continued to perform to enthusiastic audiences, inspiring new artists steeped in traditional blues, such as New York—born Taj Mahal.

John Lee Hooker blended his blues style with rock elements and playing with younger white musicians, creating a musical style that can be heard on the album Endless Boogie. King 's singing and virtuoso guitar technique earned him the eponymous title "king of the blues". King introduced a sophisticated style of guitar soloing based on fluid string Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here! (Vinyl) and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists.

Tennessee -born Bobby "Blue" Blandlike B. The music of the civil rights movement [] and Free Speech Movement in the U. As well festivals such as the Newport Folk Festival [] brought traditional blues to a new audience, which helped to revive interest in prewar acoustic blues and performers such as Son HouseMississippi John HurtSkip Jamesand Reverend Gary Davis.

Lenoir from the Chicago blues movement in the s recorded several LPs using acoustic guitar, sometimes accompanied by Willie Dixon on the acoustic bass or drums. His songs, originally distributed only in Europe, [] commented on political issues such as racism or Vietnam War issues, which was unusual for this period. His album Alabama Blues contained a song with the following lyric:. I never will go back to Alabama, that is not the place for me 2x You know they killed my sister and my brother and the whole world let them peoples go down there free.

White audiences' interest in the blues during the s increased due to the Chicago-based Paul Butterfield Blues Band featuring guitarist Michael Bloomfieldand the British blues movement.

One blues rock performer, Jimi Hendrixwas a rarity in his field at the time: a black man who played psychedelic rock. Hendrix was a skilled guitarist, and a pioneer in the innovative use of distortion and audio feedback in his music. In the early s, the Texas rock-blues style emerged, which used guitars in both solo and rhythm roles. In contrast with the West Side blues, the Texas style is strongly influenced by the British rock-blues movement.

These artists all began their musical careers in the s but they did not achieve international success until the next decade. Since the s there has been a resurgence of interest in the blues among a certain part of the African-American population, particularly around Jackson, Mississippi and other deep South regions.

Often termed " soul blues " or " Southern soul ", the music at the heart of this movement was given new life by the unexpected success of two particular recordings on the Jackson-based Malaco label: [] Z. Buchana, Ms. Jody, Shirley Brownand dozens of others. During the s blues also continued in both traditional and new forms. In the album Strong Persuader announced Robert Cray as a major blues artist. The first Stevie Ray Vaughan recording Texas Flood was released inand the Texas-based guitarist exploded onto the international stage.

John Lee Hooker 's popularity was revived with the album The Healer in Eric Claptonknown for his performances with the Blues Breakers and Creammade a comeback in the s with his album Unpluggedin which he played some standard blues numbers on acoustic guitar. However, beginning in the s, digital multitrack recording and other technological advances and new marketing strategies including video clip production increased costs, Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here!

(Vinyl) the spontaneity and improvisation that are an important component of blues music. In the s, the largely ignored hill country blues gained minor recognition in both blues and alternative rock music circles with northern Mississippi artists R. Burnside and Junior Kimbrough. The Billboard Blues Album chart provides an overview of current blues hits. Blues musical styles, forms bar bluesmelodies, and the blues scale have influenced many other genres of music, such as rock and roll, jazz, and popular music.

Gershwin's second "Prelude" for solo piano is an interesting example of a classical blues, maintaining the form with academic strictness. The blues scale is ubiquitous in modern popular music and informs many modal framesespecially the ladder of thirds used in rock music for example, in " A Hard Day's Night ". Its influence on popular singing has been so widespread that, at least among males, singing and emoting have become almost identical—it is a matter of projection rather than hitting the notes.

Early country bluesmen such as Skip JamesCharley PattonGeorgia Tom Dorsey played country and urban blues and had influences from spiritual singing. Dorsey helped to popularize Gospel music. In the s and s, gospel and blues were merged in soul blues music. Musically, spirituals were a descendant of New England choral traditions, and in particular of Isaac Watts 's hymnsmixed with African rhythms and call-and-response forms. Spirituals or religious chants in the African-American community are much better documented than the "low-down" blues.

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8 thoughts on “Jumpin At The Woodside - Count Basie And His Orchestra* - Basie Was Here! (Vinyl)

  1. Sep 21,  · By track five, in March , Freddie Green is installed and there he would remain for the rest of the Basie orchestra’s existence. It really all starts with that magical rhythm section – Walter Page on bass, Green on guitar, Jo Jones on drums and Basie calmly putting out .

  2. Blues is a music genre and musical form which was originated in the Deep South of the United States around the s by African-Americans from roots in African-American work songs, and propertychoice.biz incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative propertychoice.biz blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized.

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  6. Sep 21,  · By track five, in March , Freddie Green is installed and there he would remain for the rest of the Basie orchestra’s existence. It really all starts with that magical rhythm section – Walter Page on bass, Green on guitar, Jo Jones on drums and Basie calmly putting out his .

  7. Count Basie goes pop, and the results are mighty nice – a hard-swinging take on familiar tunes from the 60s, but all re-tooled the jazzy Basie way! The vibe here is right up there with the best Neal Hefti moments with the group – and although the arrangements are by Billy Byers, they've.

  8. Blues is a music genre and musical form which was originated in the Deep South of the United States around the s by African-Americans from roots in African-American work songs, and propertychoice.biz incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative propertychoice.biz blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized.

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